Webinar: Specific Attributes of Light, Luminaires and Relative Merits of Lighting Metrology

When:
November 17, 2021 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
2021-11-17T12:00:00-05:00
2021-11-17T13:00:00-05:00
Where:
Zoom
ZOOM LINK will be sent through confirmation email!
Cost:
Free

Museums are the rare application where we can apply our lighting expertise to create dynamic environments so people can enjoy the extraordinary objects that make us proud (or ashamed) to be humans. To do this well requires knowledge of new lighting technologies (and we will discuss those), but l am most interested in demonstrating the value of the designer who has a deep understanding of the content and a mastery of each quality of light: intensity, distribution, movement, spectrum, and angle of incidence. The presentation is richly illustrated with examples of Smithsonian exhibitions showing how we light artworks so they may be better seen, understood, and experienced. Special attention will be given to advances in LEDs, Bluetooth lighting controls and the utility and limits of lighting metrics like CRI, TM30, and illuminance.

The presentation will cover the following topics. While the focus will be on museum lighting, my talk is also equally applicable to other applications such as retail, landscape lighting.

Learning Objectives

  • Show museum lighting techniques employed at the Smithsonian American Art Museum and Renwick Gallery,
  • Discuss recent installation of BLE lighting and associated lighting control systems.
  • Discuss the relative value of metrics including but not limited to illuminance, luminance, spectral damage function, CRI, and the associated TM30 metrics.
  • Demonstrate how good light, and great art, can create and inspire wonder.

Presenter:
Scott RosenfeldScott Rosenfeld is the Lighting Designer at the Smithsonian American Art Museum and Renwick Gallery.  Scott’s research focuses on detailing the specific attributes of light, luminaires, and what makes a successful lighting design. Of particular interest is research on the relative merits of lighting metrology vs. a designer’s eye to make lighting decisions. To achieve this goal Scott has collaborated with color scientists to learn how light can improve vision and museum conservation scientists to learn how to assess the damage potential of optical energy.

Scott is chair of the Illuminating Engineering Societies (IES) Museum and Art Gallery Committee where he leads an international committee to write standards including RP:30-2020, The American National Standard for lighting museums.

Additional lighting design projects outside Smithsonian include The Phillips Collection (D.C), JP Morgan Chase (NY, NY), Mark Twain House and Museum (Hartford, CN.), and The Walters Art Gallery (Baltimore, MD). Scott frequently lectures about how lighting can allow visitors to better see and appreciate artwork at conferences including, The American Institute of Architects (AIA), The International Association of Lighting Designers (IALD), The Illuminating Engineering Society (IES), the Getty Conservation Institute and Lightfair International.